July 20th, 2006

Virginia Congressional Candidate Targets Video Game Violence

Yet another candidate for political office has jumped on the video game violence issue.

Phil Kellam, a Democrat running for Congress in Virgina, is currently airing a television ad which discusses the candidate's promise to stop the sale of violent video games to children.

Although GP has not yet seen the ad, its script is available on Kellam's campaign website, and reads, in part:

"A father of two, Phil Kellam knows that in today's world raising and protecting our children is more difficult than ever. That's why in Congress, Phil Kellam will stand with parents; to stop the sale of violent video games to children, and block children's access to websites with violent or sexual content."

A GP shout-out to forum user Skraith for the heads-up on this one...

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Motion Denied... Federal Judge Says No to Jack Thompson

In a terse, one-page ruling, Federal District Court Judge James Brady has refused to permit controversial Miami attorney Jack Thompson to file an amicus curiae ("friend of the court") brief in the ongoing lawsuit over Louisiana's recently-enacted video game law.

Thompson, of course, was heavily involved in the Louisiana statute, helping Rep. Roy Burrell (D) draft the underlying legislation, HB 1381. The anti-game attorney claimed in his request to the court that Louisiana Attorney General Charles Foti, a named defendant in the case, approved of Thompson's amicus motion.

As previously reported here on GamePolitics, Thompson's request to file an amicus brief - if granted - would have permitted the long-time video game industry nemesis to provide information to the court even though he is not a party to the lawsuit.

Shortly after Thompson made his request to the court, game industry lawyers objected to the Miami attorney's participation on a variety of technical grounds. Among these was Thompson's signature on his amicus motion, which lists him as "Defendant and Co-Counsel." The game industry contends that he is neither. For his part, Judge Brady appears to have found the industry's argument convincing.

Thompson's amicus motion (in MS Word format) can be seen here. The industry's objection (pdf) is here. For all GamePolitics coverage of the Thompson amicus issue, click here.

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